canada africa partner reservation Amazon’s drone delivery program faces heat hurdles in Arizona

Amazon’s drone delivery program faces heat hurdles in Arizona

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The company will not accept orders if the temperature exceeds 40 degrees Celsius

What’s the story

Amazon’s ambitious plan to launch a drone delivery fleet in Arizona, US, is facing significant obstacles due to the state’s extreme summer temperatures.

WIRED reports that the drones cannot function in temperatures above 104 degrees Fahrenheit (or 40 degrees Celsius).

This is problematic because Tolleson, Arizona, where Amazon plans to launch the service, experiences such high temperatures for three months each year.

The Prime Air initiative faces several challenges

The heat problem is just one of many hurdles Amazon has encountered in its decade-long attempt to establish a mainstream drone delivery service through its Prime Air initiative.

The company recently announced the closure of its drone delivery operations in Lockeford, California, after two years.

Despite setting a goal of making 500 million deliveries by 2030, Amazon has only completed thousands of them so far.

While Amazon remains committed to the concept, Amazon may soon launch the service in Italy and the United Kingdom.

Competing with Google’s Wing service

In contrast to Amazon’s drone delivery numbers, Google’s competing Wing service has completed hundreds of thousands of deliveries. In addition to weather-related challenges, Amazon also needs permits for its next-generation drone, MK30.

Drone delivery requires customer consent

The proposed drone delivery service will require customers to sign up to have a 36kg drone drop a package on a QR code mat in their backyard.

“We will not take orders if temperatures exceed 104 degrees,” said Calsee Hendrickson, director of product and program management for Amazon Prime Air.

However, an Amazon spokesperson countered this by stating that deliveries would continue throughout the summer, without denying that the local climate could hinder these efforts.